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Every Breath You Take

Sigmund Freud developed his psychoanalytic theory through his correspondence with an ENT specialist (W Fliess) who together concluded that there are reflexes that exist between nasal lining and reproductive organs and this was termed as ‘nasal reflex neurosis’. Others who continued the research found that menstrual cramps were related to the inflammation and discoloration of specific areas in the lining of nose. When anesthetized, the menstrual pains would disappear. There is much more to this when we take a deep dive into the study of breath and another example is nasal erectile tissue. [Refer to Science of Breath by Swami Rama, Rudolph Ballentine and Alan Hymes for an indepth analysis].

What is the connection between the Mind(Brain) and the human body?. This is obviously not an easy question unless you are practising Yoga or any such technique that involves heavy focus on the breath or to put in precise terms, the inhalation and exhalation part. The breath and mind are interdependent in that if one retains the breath, his mind is calm and clear while an erratic breath pattern will dissipate the mind.

It has been known in Yogic circles that the breath is the carrier of the energy which interfaces between the body and mind. Beyond the mind is the intellect and beyond that is the soul. The interesting thing to observe is that breathing is an involuntary function, it can be quite a vantage for a human body in terms of effective organ functioning if there is some technique that can be deployed to make it more voluntary.

Lets look at one technique called the ‘Infradian Rythm’ which was recently accepted by the scientific community where the breathing is alternated between two nostrils rhythmically. This is known as ‘nadi shodhanam’ in yoga which uses diaphragmatic breathing instead of the lungs. The ancient yogis observed that the right side breathing facilitated more aggression and alertness towards the external world while the left side breathing produced a more passive psychological state.

So when are you starting to experience the Pranayama a.k.a ‘The science of breath’?

Published on : May 26th, 2011

About the Author

Rahul Pathri
Rahul Pathri is the founder/CEO for Docturnal. He has a bachelors in Biology with an Executive Management from IIM Calcutta. Currently assumes the role of a Data Scientist & has been an IT guy in his past life working in the US biotech industry as well as Multinationals in India.
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6 Comments (Post your comment)

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